London Air Travel’s Atlantic Update – 8 August 2018

The Atlantic Update is published every Wednesday morning at 06:00 BST, providing a weekly bulletin on developments on transatlantic travel between Europe and North America.

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Hudson River Park New York
Hudson River Park New York (Image Credit: London Air Travel)

Hello and welcome to the The Atlantic Update for Wednesday 8 August 2018, providing a weekly bulletin on developments on transatlantic travel between Europe and North America. The Atlantic Update is published every Wednesday morning at 06:00 BST.

Norwegian wet leases HiFly Airbus A380

As has been widely reported in aviation circles online, Norwegian has, since Friday 3 August 2018, wet-leased a second-hand HiFly Airbus A380 to cover one of its daily flights from London Gatwick to New York JFK (DI7015 / DI7016).

Few would ordinarily complain about travelling on a former Singapore Airlines Airbus A380. However, there is one big problem.

Due to the number of Airbus A380 flights scheduled to arrive at New York JFK Terminal 1 at the same time such as Air France AF10 from Paris Charles de Gaulle and Emirates EK205 from Dubai and Milan, its departure time from Gatwick has been changed from 17:05 to 21:05. This means arriving at JFK at around midnight, which clearly scuppers any chances of late night drinks in Manhattan.

Worse still, for passengers travelling from New York JFK to Gatwick the inbound flight is delayed until past 03:00, by which time many will have been without a hotel room for over 15 hours.

Affected passengers do have the option of rebooking to an alternative flight. However, do bear in mind the alternative flight (DI7013) departs Gatwick at around 05:30-06:30 in the morning. The timing is brutal in terms of both getting to Gatwick in the early hours of the morning and trying to stay up for the rest of the day on arrival in New York.

Third party databases are currently showing the wet lease in operation until Wednesday 15 August 2018 at the earliest.
Continue reading “London Air Travel’s Atlantic Update – 8 August 2018”

London Air Travel’s Atlantic Update – 1 August 2018

The Atlantic Update is published every Wednesday morning at 06:00 BST, providing a weekly bulletin on developments on transatlantic travel between Europe and North America.

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Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh (Image Credit: British Airways)

Hello and welcome to the The Atlantic Update for Wednesday 1 August 2018, providing a weekly bulletin on developments on transatlantic travel between Europe and North America. The Atlantic Update is published every Wednesday morning at 06:00 BST.

BA launches Pittsburgh. What’s Next?

BA continues a steady expansion of its North Atlantic route network at London Heathrow with the launch of Pittsburgh from April 2019.

This follows a methodical approach of announcing one new route a year to cities not served by a direct route to London or, in some cases, Europe. Previous new routes include Austin, San Jose, New Orleans and Nashville.

Austin has, judging by recent capacity increases, been very successful. San Jose has been subject to targeted cancellations during Boeing 787 groundings. It is too soon to judge New Orleans or Nashville.

It is no secret that a lot of US airports would love to secure a direct link to London. Some have been meeting with BA for many years. Airports have offered BA a package of incentives such as deals on landing fees and revenue guarantees.

It is likely that there will be 1-2 further new routes. BA has actively avoided launching routes already served by Delta at Heathrow. Being the sole operator of a route to London does give the airline pricing power in the market. So that excludes Detroit, Minneapolis, Portland and Salt Lake City.

The expansion will end at some point, but there are still candidates for new routes such as Indianapolis, Kansas and St Louis.

US East Coast Weather Disruption

Storms are forecast in the New York airport area due to over the next couple of days.

Delta has issued a weather waiver for passengers due to travel today. There’s broad New York airport advice from the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey.

New York on Los Angeles. Los Angeles on New York.

It’s always interesting to read how your “home” city or country is covered by international media outlets.

Sometimes you learn cold hard truths. If you want to understand how Brexit is actually progressing you need to read the European press. Sometimes it can be gloriously wide-eyed. Or plain inaccurate.

The New York Times has attracted considerable criticism for an article on quiet spaces in Los Angeles by novelist Reif Larsen. It has been criticised by readers for its factual inaccuracies and its attitude towards Latino culture in Los Angeles.

However, the New York Times has also published a more thoughtful article on the prospects of success for an estimated $100billion high speed rail line between San Francisco and Los Angeles.

Urbanize.LA has also published a useful primer on the geography of Los Angeles County, which comprises some 88 cities, in comparison to New York.

KLM launches Amsterdam – Boston

KLM has announced it will fly to Boston three times weekly from Sunday 31 March 2019.

This will complement the twice-daily service of its joint-venture partner’s Delta. (KLM)

Also Of Note This Week

Flying to Cape Cod (London Air Travel) and the Florida Keys. (London Air Travel)

American Airlines has launched a new TV advertising campaign highlighting its “Flagship First” international service. (AdAge)

American Airlines has changed its “basic economy” fare for US domestic flights. From Wednesday 5 September 2018, this will include a carry on bag allowance. (American Airlines)

Delta has announced a new route from Detroit to San Jose from Thursday 15 November 2018. (Delta)

United has announced a new daily service from Washington Dulles to Miami from Wednesday 19 December 2018. (United)

WestJet has reported a second quarter loss of CAD$20.8 million citing increased fuel prices, competitor capacity and threatened industrial action. (WestJet)

Late Post Publication Updates:

The Atlantic Update is published every Wednesday at 06:00 BST. If you have any comments, suggestions or tips then please drop us a line at mail [@] londonairtravel.com

London Air Travel’s Atlantic Update – 25 July 2018

The Atlantic Update is published every Wednesday morning at 06:00 BST, providing a weekly bulletin on developments on transatlantic travel between Europe and North America.

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Virgin Atlantic, Air France KLM and Delta
Virgin Atlantic, Air France KLM and Delta

Hello and welcome to the The Atlantic Update for Wednesday 25 July 2018, providing a weekly bulletin on developments on transatlantic travel between Europe and North America. The Atlantic Update is published every Wednesday morning at 06:00 BST.

Air France, Delta, KLM and Virgin Atlantic at London Heathrow

As we reported on Sunday, Air France-KLM, Delta and Virgin Atlantic have sought regulatory approval to combine their two transatlantic joint-ventures.

At present, Delta has a joint-venture with Virgin Atlantic covering flights between the UK and the US. It also has an entirely separate joint-venture with Air France-KLM covering flights between Europe and the US.

What’s the rationale behind combining them?

Put simply, American Airlines and BA.

Delta and Virgin Atlantic serve all major US gateways from London Heathrow, bar some exceptions such as Chicago. They serve cities such as Los Angeles and New York with a competitive level of frequency. They also have a growing presence in Manchester.

However, it is clear from their submission that this is not enough to win corporate contracts and the loyalty of European frequent flyers from American and BA. Following the merger of bmi British Midland into BA in 2012, Virgin has very little by way of short-haul connections at Heathrow. It also has a shrinking non-US network.

A key principle behind these joint-ventures is the concept of “metal neutrality”. All participating must treat each others flights equally for marketing purposes.

By combining their joint-ventures, the four airlines will be able to offer a vast number of connections from the UK, mainland Europe and the rest of the world to North America via Heathrow, Amsterdam and Paris Charles de Gaulle. Air France and KLM have a much stronger non-US network than BA, notably in Africa and Asia.

Passengers in the UK will have the option of connecting via Paris Charles de Gaulle, albeit with an element of backtracking, to flights not served at London Heathrow such as Cincinnati, Indianapolis and Pittsburgh.

Virgin Atlantic will also be able to draw feed from Amsterdam and Paris to routes not served by either airport such as Las Vegas, which moves to London Heathrow in March 2019.

The combined joint-venture will also have a much stronger presence at UK regional airports. Indeed, KLM operates from a number of UK airports not served by BA such as Cardiff, Durham Tees Valley, Humberside and Norwich.

The possibility of all four airlines consolidating in the same terminal at Heathrow has also been mooted. This is of course subject to the agreement of the airport.
Continue reading “London Air Travel’s Atlantic Update – 25 July 2018”

London Air Travel’s Atlantic Update – 18 July 2018

The Atlantic Update is published every Wednesday morning at 06:00 BST, providing a weekly bulletin on developments on transatlantic travel between Europe and North America.

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Airbus A220-300 Aircraft (Image Credit: Airbus)
Airbus A220-300 Aircraft (Image Credit: Airbus)

Hello and welcome to the The Atlantic Update for Wednesday 18 July 2018, providing a weekly bulletin on developments on transatlantic travel between Europe and North America. The Atlantic Update is published every Wednesday morning at 06:00 BST.

New US Airline Commits To 60 Airbus A220-300 Aircraft

When Virgin America was folded into Alaska Airlines earlier this year, many passengers mourned the passing of a young upstart and continued consolidation in the US airline industry.

There now appears to be firm plans for a new US airline start-up. Airbus has confirmed that an as yet unnamed airline has committed to 60 Airbus A220-300 aircraft (formerly known as the Bombardier CSeries) for delivery from 2021. Last week JetBlue also announced that it had ordered 60 of the Airbus A220-300 aircraft.

The new airline will be founded by a group of investors led by David Neeleman, founder of JetBlue. It should be noted that at this stage there is only a Memorandum Of Understanding, and not a firm order.

Breaking into the US domestic market is not easy. Readers may recall the launch of Virgin America was subject to intensive lobbying efforts which delayed its launch. There were also competitive responses to new route launches with incumbent airlines aggressively adding capacity on matching routes to dilute fares.

United Fleet Order

On a more cautious note, United has announced it has ordered 25 Embraer E-175 aircraft and 4 new Boeing 787-9 aircraft.

The new Embraer aircraft will be delivered in 2019 and will replace an equivalent number of CRJ-700 aircraft operated by United Express. The Boeing 787-9 aircraft will be delivered in 2020 and will also act as replacement aircraft, but no further detail has been provided.

Primera Air confirms Winter transatlantic schedule

Primera Air’s launch of transatlantic routes from the UK did not get off to the best start.

It cancelled the planned launch of transatlantic routes from Birmingham to Newark and Toronto. The launch of Stansted to Toronto was delayed. It had to wet lease aircraft to cover Stansted – Newark and this route has been beset by delays and cancellations.

However, Primera Air is soldiering on into the winter. Routes from Stansted to Newark, Toronto and Washington will continue throughout the winter. Stansted to Boston will end in early December. Primera Air has yet to confirm schedules for Summer 2019.

US “Big Three” Airlines Release Q2 Results

All of the “Big Three” US airlines have now released their Q2 financial results.

Some performed better than expectations, notably United. There is less positive news at Delta which is seen as the industry leader. It reported a fall in net profit. A key theme is increasing fuel prices which airlines will seek to pass on to passengers through higher ticket prices. No doubt this will be a similar theme in Europe as well.

Also Of Note This Week

Air Canada is to open a refurbished Maple Leaf Lounge in St John’s International Airport this autumn. (Air Canada)

Alaska Airlines launches its new summer menu which will be available until 15 November 2018. (Alaska Airlines)

Late Post Publication Updates:

[Reseved for updates during the day.]

The Atlantic Update is published every Wednesday at 06:00 BST. If you have any comments, suggestions or tips then please drop us a line at mail [@] londonairtravel.com

London Air Travel’s Atlantic Update – 11 July 2018

The Atlantic Update is published every Wednesday morning at 06:00 BST, providing a weekly bulletin on developments on transatlantic travel between Europe and North America.

London Air Travel » Atlantic Update » Page 8

jetBlue Airbus A220-300 aircraft
jetBlue Airbus A220-300 aircraft (Image Credit: Airbus)

Hello and welcome to the The Atlantic Update for Wednesday 11 July 2018, providing a weekly bulletin on developments on transatlantic travel between Europe and North America. The Atlantic Update is published every Wednesday morning at 06:00 BST.

JetBlue to order the Airbus A220-300

Airbus held a press event yesterday, Tuesday 10 July 2018, to mark the launch of the Airbus A220-100 and A220-300.

These aircraft were formerly known as the Bombardier C-Series CS100 and CS300. SWISS operate the A220-300 on selected flights between London Heathrow and Geneva.

JetBlue has announced it has ordered 60 A220-300 aircraft which will be delivered from 2020. It also has options for a further 60 aircraft which, if exercised, would be delivered from 2025. The aircraft will be used to replace JetBlue’s existing fleet of 60 Embraer E190 aircraft from 2020 to 2025.

JetBlue has also converted an existing order 25 Airbus A320neo to Airbus A321neo aircraft.

It is interesting to note that the JetBlue press release makes no mention of any orders for the Airbus A321 Long Range which, if ordered, could be used to launch services to Europe.

Virgin Atlantic adds flights for Las Vegas Consumer Electronics Show

Last year Virgin Atlantic added special flights from London Heathrow to Las Vegas for the Consumer Electronic Show.

These will return in 2019. Virgin Atlantic will add additional flights from London Heathrow to Las Vegas on Saturday 5, Sunday 6, Monday 7 and Thursday 10 January 2019. Return flights from Las Vegas operate on Saturday 5, Sunday 6, Thursday 10 and Friday 11 January 2019.

This is in advance of Virgin permanently moving the route from Gatwick to Heathrow from Sunday 31 March 2019.

Virgin Atlantic’s transatlantic joint-venture partner Delta will also operate special flights between Amsterdam, Paris Charles de Gaulle and Las Vegas along with Air France and KLM.
Continue reading “London Air Travel’s Atlantic Update – 11 July 2018”

London Air Travel’s Atlantic Update – 4 July 2018

The Atlantic Update is published every Wednesday morning at 06:00 BST, providing a weekly bulletin on developments on transatlantic travel between Europe and North America.

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Cape Cod
Cape Cod, Massachusetts (Image Credit: London Air Travel)

Hello and welcome to the The Atlantic Update for Wednesday 4 July 2018, providing a weekly bulletin on developments on transatlantic travel between Europe and North America. The Atlantic Update is published every Wednesday morning at 06:00 BST.

You say deplane, I say disembark

Today is of course Independence Day in the United States, at a very challenging time for many constitutional norms in the country.

Judging by our Instagram feeds, many are spending it in Cape Cod, pictured above, where its always fun to fly around on Cape Air and its tiny Cessna 402 aircraft.

Primera Air Delays

Primera Air is almost three months into long-haul operations at London Stansted.

It is now flying to Newark, Boston and Toronto, with Washington Dulles to follow in August. However, it has not been an easy start. Primera Air has had to lease in aircraft to cover the late delivery of Airbus 321 aircraft. Flights to Newark have been covered by National Airlines Boeing 757 aircraft over the past ten days or so. However, this has resulted in delays with some departures delayed extensively into the early hours of the morning, resulting in a brutal early morning arrival in New York.

Long-haul operations aren’t easy for small airlines as its much harder to cover aircraft availability issues with such a small fleet and without the support of joint-venture and alliance partners. However, a reputation of operational reliability is vital for all airlines, particularly new market entrants.
Continue reading “London Air Travel’s Atlantic Update – 4 July 2018”

London Air Travel’s Atlantic Update – 27 June 2018

The Atlantic Update is published every Wednesday morning at 06:00 BST, providing a weekly bulletin on developments on transatlantic travel between Europe and North America.

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Norwegian Boeing 787 at London Gatwick
Norwegian Boeing 787 at London Gatwick (Image Credit: Norwegian)

Hello and welcome to the The Atlantic Update for Wednesday 27 June 2018, providing a weekly bulletin on developments on transatlantic travel between Europe and North America. The Atlantic Update is published every Wednesday morning at 06:00 BST.

Norwegian reshapes London Gatwick long-haul network

Norwegian announced a new route from London Gatwick to Tampa earlier this week. The airline will fly to Tampa twice weekly from Wednesday 31 October 2018.

Norwegian was naturally keen to emphasise its expanding network from Gatwick. Whilst that is true, arguably the real story is that Norwegian is cutting back some routes which have launched only very recently, notably Austin and Chicago. Both routes launched at the end of March this year. Norwegian is to suspend Austin for the winter, along with Seattle. Chicago, a route which Virgin Atlantic long struggled with at Heathrow, will be reduced from daily to four times weekly. Oakland will also be cut from four to three times weekly.

This does suggest Norwegian has reached a ceiling on new routes to North America, at least with the Boeing 787. On a more positive note, Boston and Fort Lauderdale will increase to daily. Norwegian is also increasing frequency to Orlando from three to four times weekly.

Full details of the route changes are here.

BA suspends Oakland permanently

BA has now suspended London Gatwick – Oakland permanently.

This route had been suspended for the winter and was due to resume at the end of March 2019. However, it has now been suspended indefinitely.

Passengers whose flights have been cancelled are entitled to a refund. Passengers can also travel to San Francisco International Airport from London Heathrow. However, any consequential costs such as ground transportation will be at your expense.

Passengers who were due to fly after 31 March 2019 also have the option of flying from London Heathrow to Seattle on BA and connecting on to an Alaska Airlines flight from Seattle to Oakland.

BA has not yet indicated how the spare capacity at Gatwick may be utilised. BA’s IAG sibling LEVEL did move one of its flights from Oakland to San Francisco, which may provide a clue.

Severe Weather Warning

US airlines are warning of severe weather in the North East of the USA on Wednesday 27 June 2018.

Delta has issued a weather waiver for passengers due to travel through Boston, New York and Washington area airports.

Inside The American Embassy

On a slight tangent, readers in the UK can watch the first episode of the three part documentary Inside The American Embassy from Channel 4.

Produced by Field Day Productions, the programme affords a very rare insight into the workings of the US Embassy which, at both Grosvenor Square and Vauxhall, has long had a strong visible presence in London, but only from the outside. Many readers may have course visited the embassy for Global Entry interviews. There is a vague aviation connection in the first episode!

Also of note this week:

Rick Scott, Governor of Florida, has announced that the Florida Department of Transportation will begin a tender process to allow private companies to bid to construct a new high speed rail link between Orlando and Tampa, which must be privately funded. A new passenger rail service Brightline between Miami and West Palm Beach also launched earlier this year. (Florida Department of Transportation)

Also, here’s an extraordinary account from The New York Times as to why local public transport projects, which seem so obvious to outsiders, are so politically fraught in the US.

Late Post Publication Updates:

[Reseved for updates during the day.]

The Atlantic Update is published every Wednesday at 06:00 BST. If you have any comments, suggestions or tips then please drop us a line at mail [@] londonairtravel.com

London Air Travel’s Atlantic Update – 20 June 2018

The Atlantic Update is published every Wednesday morning at 06:00 BST, providing a weekly bulletin on developments on transatlantic travel between Europe and North America.

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Norwegian Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner
Norwegian Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner

Hello and welcome to the The Atlantic Update for Wednesday 20 June 2018, providing a weekly bulletin on developments on transatlantic travel between Europe and North America. The Atlantic Update is published every Wednesday morning at 06:00 BST.

Does Lufthansa really want to buy Norwegian?

Interest in the possible sale of Norwegian was piqued earlier this week after Lufthansa revealed it had held discussions with the airline about a possible bid.

It appears that no offer has been tabled. Lufthansa Group CEO Carsten Spohr made only vague comments about ongoing consolidation in Europe. Lufthansa is of course no stranger to low cost travel. It has transferred all short-haul operations outside of its Frankfurt and Munich hubs to Eurowings. It has also launched low cost long-haul routes under the Eurowings brand, but has stayed firmly in its home territory at cities such as Cologne and Dusseldorf.

This is in sharp contrast to both Norwegian and IAG’s own low cost long-haul brand LEVEL which have sought to become true pan-European brands.

Lufthansa buying Norwegian would give it a substantial presence at Gatwick. And this would not the first time Lufthansa has gained a strong foothold in London. It acquired full control of bmi British Midland in 2009, albeit not entirely at a time and price of its choosing. Its former owner Sir Michael Bishop exercised an option to sell the airline to Lufthansa that had previously been agreed in 1999. Three years later, after heavy losses and many cash injections through debt for equity swaps, Lufthansa sold bmi to BA’s parent company IAG and substantially weakened the Star Alliance in London in the process.

Whoever takes over Norwegian will need to undertake aggressive action to improve its financial performance. IAG would probably retain the Norwegian brand and it has indicated it would keep its existing customer proposition in tact. What IAG would probably do is curtail its growth ambitions, refocus the route network on profitable flying and transfer many back office functions to its internal Global Business Services platform. It is not so certain that Lufthansa would be able to do this with the same vigour. It is also uncertain whether Lufthansa would have the appetite to compete at Gatwick where BA has already made a number of competitive moves against Norwegian.

Fort Lauderdale Runway Closure

The Associated Press reports that Fort Lauderdale airport is to close one of its two runways for five months from June 2019.

During this time all arriving and departing flights will have to use the south runway. This is likely to lead to a reduction in flights to the airport of around 20-25%.
Continue reading “London Air Travel’s Atlantic Update – 20 June 2018”

London Air Travel’s Atlantic Update – 13 June 2018

The Atlantic Update is published every Wednesday morning at 06:00 BST, providing a weekly bulletin on developments on transatlantic travel between Europe and North America.

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Terminal 2, Dublin Airport
Terminal 2, Dublin Airport (Image Credit: Dublin Airport)

Hello and welcome to the The Atlantic Update for Wednesday 13 June 2018, providing a weekly bulletin on developments on transatlantic travel between Europe and North America. The Atlantic Update is published every Wednesday morning at 06:00 BST.

Willie Walsh on Aer Lingus growth opportunities

International Airlines Group CEO Willie Walsh spoke at the IATA AGM last week and GTMC conference this week. At both events, Willie Walsh was keen to talk about the growth opportunities for Aer Lingus.

Whilst Aer Lingus may not be the largest member of IAG, by profit margin it is the star pupil of the group. In recent years it has added many new transatlantic routes including Miami, Philadelphia and Seattle.

Next year, Aer Lingus will take delivery of four of twelve Airbus A321 Long Range aircraft on order. This aircraft is a variant of the Airbus A321neo with a range of 4,000 nautical miles. Aer Lingus has invited US airports to express an interest in it opening new routes. Unsurprisingly, there has been a strong response from many airports.

It is expected that new routes operated by the Airbus A321 Long Range next year will be announced in the coming months, as well as additional frequencies to existing routes. This could well introduce new transatlantic routes to Europe, with the benefit of Customs & immigration pre-clearance in Dublin.

On a related note, there is still no word of any progress in Aer Lingus joining either the transatlantic joint-venture with American Airlines and BA, nor the Oneworld alliance.

As far as BA is concerned, it has traditionally announced one new long-haul route from London Heathrow to North America a year. The most recent ones being Austin, San Jose, New Orleans and Nashville. However, Willie Walsh did indicate that this was unlikely to happen this year.

BA Confirms Calgary Suspension

British Airways has suspended London Heathrow – Calgary for the winter season

As reported last week, BA has confirmed it has suspended London Heathrow – Calgary from Sunday 28 October 2018 to Sunday 31 March 2019.

Full details of rebooking options are here. Passengers are entitled to a refund, or to rebook to an alternative BA destination in the US and Canada. BA has now also secured a rebooking agreement with United Airlines via Chicago O’Hare and other hubs in the US. Further rebooking options may become available in the next few days.

It is relatively rare for BA to suspend a transatlantic route from Heathrow, even for the winter season. The last suspension we can recall is London Heathrow – Detroit in 2008.

Also of note this week:

United’s first Boeing 737 MAX 9 aircraft enters service. (United)

Late Post Publication Updates:

[Reseved for updates during the day.]

The Atlantic Update is published every Wednesday at 06:00 BST. If you have any comments, suggestions or tips then please drop us a line at mail [@] londonairtravel.com

London Air Travel’s Atlantic Update – 6 June 2018

The Atlantic Update is published every Wednesday morning at 06:00 BST, providing a weekly bulletin on developments on transatlantic travel between Europe and North America.

London Air Travel » Atlantic Update » Page 8

American Airlines, Jet Blue, United, Virgin Atlantic Pride Logos (Respective Image Credit)

Hello and welcome to the The Atlantic Update for Wednesday 6 June 2018, providing a weekly bulletin on developments on transatlantic travel between Europe and North America. The Atlantic Update is published every Wednesday morning at 06:00 BST.

BA takes London Heathrow – Calgary off sale for the winter

British Airways has taken its route from London Heathrow to Calgary off sale for the winter season from Sunday 28 October 2018 to Sunday 31 March 2019.

The airline has not officially confirmed the suspension. An official statement, with details for rebooking arrangements for affected passengers, should be released in the next couple of days.

The route launched in December 2006 with a Boeing 767 aircraft. It then switched to a Boeing 787 aircraft in July 2014.

BA does not have a local airline partner in Canada. Its codeshare partnership with WestJet ceased, for reasons never disclosed, in October 2016. In the absence of local codeshare partners, BA passengers would have to connect onto American Airlines’ services to Calgary from the US.

Primera Air cancels long-haul flights from Birmingham

Primera has cancelled its entire long-haul schedule from Birmingham International Airport for the summer.

Flights from Birmingham to Newark will be suspended from Thursday 21 June 2018. Toronto Pearson will not launch as originally planned on Tuesday 26 June 2018.

Whilst the finger of blame has been pointed squarley at Airbus for late deliveries of Airbus A321neo aircraft, this is indicative how hard long-haul operations are for relatively small airlines.
Continue reading “London Air Travel’s Atlantic Update – 6 June 2018”