British Airways Extends Use of eVouchers To 30 April 2023

British Airways has extended the use of evouchers to pay for flights for travel up to 30 April 2023.

London Air Travel » British Airways

British Airways Airbus A350-1000 Wing Tip
British Airways Airbus A350-1000 Wing Tip (Image Credit: British Airways)

British Airways has extended the use of “eVouchers” for travel up to and including 30 April 2023.

Passengers who had booked to fly with BA and did not wish to travel have been issued with “eVouchers” which can be used online to pay for future flight bookings.

Until today, 28 January 2021, eVouchers could only be used for flight bookings that had been fully completed by 30 April 2022.

In a sign that there is limited prospect of international travel returning to normal until well into 2022, this deadline has been extended to 30 April 2023. This applies to all eVouchers. Any existing eVouchers issued with a previous deadline of 30 April 2022 are automatically extended.

It should be emphasised that this is the deadline for travel to be completed, not for bookings to be made.

The deadline for the use “Future Travel Vouchers” which were issued in the early stages of the pandemic has also been extended to 30 April 2023.

This follows a decision by the airline to remove the expiry date of its “Book With Confidence” policy, whereby change fees are waived for all new flight bookings with also the option to convert the value of their ticket into an eVoucher.

Detailed guidance on the use of eVouchers is available on ba.com

© Copyright London Air Travel 2021.

BA Extends Gatwick Short Haul Cancellations To May 2021

BA will not operate short haul flights at Gatwick, except for Glasgow & Manchester, until 23 May 2021 at the earliest.

London Air Travel » British Airways

British Airways, London Gatwick
British Airways, London Gatwick

British Airways has extended the transfer of most Gatwick short haul flights to London Heathrow until Sunday 23 May 2021 at the earliest.

BA temporarily transferred all Gatwick short haul routes to London Heathrow in April last year.

This will continue until 23 May 2021, with the exception of flights to Glasgow which will start at Gatwick on Sunday 28 March 2021.

Another delay is not surprising given there is very little chance of travel restrictions in Europe being relaxed in the coming months. If restrictions continue throughout the summer and a waiver is issued which allows BA to cancel flights without forfeiting slots, it is likely to be extended.

At present, BA is operating a limited number of long haul flights at Gatwick to Antigua, Bermuda, Cancun and St Lucia. BA is also due to transfer flights to Accra and Doha to Gatwick from 28 March 2021.

Passengers can check the status of their bookings using the Manage My Booking tool on ba.com and should contact BA or their travel agent.

Update February 2021

BA has delayed the start of Manchester flights at Gatwick until Sunday 31 October 2021. Flights to Islamabad will also continue to operate at London Heathrow throughout the summer season.

© Copyright London Air Travel 2021.

BA Introduces Pre Paid Short Haul Catering

BA is to replace its buy on board menu on short haul economy flights with a pre order menu called “Speedbird Cafe”.

London Air Travel » British Airways

British Airways, Short Haul Economy Speedbird Cafe, January 2021
British Airways, Short Haul Economy Speedbird Cafe, January 2021 (Image Credit: British Airways)

When British Airways introduced buy on board catering to short haul flights in 2017 then CEO Alex Cruz was convinced that it was only a matter of time before its network rivals followed suit.

Four years and a global pandemic later, events have taken an interesting turn.

Whilst Lufthansa is introducing buy on board across its airlines from March 2021, BA has pulled a minor volte face.

Since COVID-19, BA has offered a limited service in short haul economy of complimentary water and a light snack, with no buy on board to limit passenger / crew interaction.

This is now permanent. From Wednesday 20 January 2021, buy on board will be replaced with a fully pre paid service known as “Speedbird Cafe”.

BA will no longer sell M&S branded products. It will continue to offer a range of soft and alcoholic drinks, ambient snacks, as well as some sandwiches designed for the airline by Tom Kerridge. Worry not, the infamous Afternoon Tea box is still available.

You can download a full PDF menu here – note this is a large file.

Continue reading “BA Introduces Pre Paid Short Haul Catering”

How The Boeing 747 Transformed Flying From London

Concluding our series on the Boeing 747, how it transformed flying from London bringing new airlines, new routes and reducing journey times.

London Air Travel » British Airways

British Airways Boeing 747, Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport
British Airways Boeing 747, Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport (Image Credit: British Airways)

Concluding our series on the story of the Boeing 747 at BA, here’s a broader look at how the aircraft transformed flying from London over the past 50 years.

The 747 Brought New Airlines To London

Air New Zealand, Avianca, Cathay Pacific, Braniff International (aided by deregulation of the US market) and Virgin Atlantic all launched their first services from London with the Boeing 747.

As you can see from Air New Zealand advert below it, as many airlines did, likened the Boeing 747 to a flying hotel.

Air New Zealand, London Gatwick - Auckland, August 1982
Air New Zealand, Boeing 747 London Gatwick – Auckland, August 1982
Avianca, London Gatwick - Bogota, via Madrid & Barranquilla, May 1978
Avianca, Boeing 747 London Gatwick – Bogota, via Madrid & Barranquilla, May 1978
Braniff International, London Gatwick - Dallas / Fort Worth, February 1978
Braniff International, London Gatwick – Dallas / Fort Worth, February 1978
Continue reading “How The Boeing 747 Transformed Flying From London”

British Airways’ Special Boeing 747 Charter Flights

Our story of the Boeing 747 at BA continues with special charters, including flights for sports teams and members of the Royal Family.

London Air Travel » British Airways

Dreamflight, London Heathrow, 2015 (Image Credit: British Airways)
Dreamflight, London Heathrow, 2015 (Image Credit: British Airways)

Continuing our series on the story of the Boeing 747 at BA, here are some of more memorable BA 747 flights from the past 40 years. 

Unlike yesterday’s more controversial flights, these are special charter flights for moments of celebration and significance:

Dreamflight

Dreamflight, London Heathrow, Sunday 27 October 2019
Dreamflight, London Heathrow, Sunday 27 October 2019 (Image Credit: British Airways)

Founded in 1986 by former staff members Patricia Pearce MBE and Derek Pereira, Dreamflight raised funds to charter a BA 747 to fly children with a serious illness or disability to Orlando.

Approximately 200 children travelled on the flight with BA cabin crew and a dedicated medical team.

Each flight was given a special send-off at London Heathrow with BA staff and celebrity guests. Since the first flight in 1987 more than 5,800 children have flown on Dreamflight.

Sadly, Dreamflight did not take place in 2020 due to COVID-19. Hopefully, it will be able to resume, with a different aircraft, in 2021.

Dreamflight, London Heathrow, 2017
Dreamflight, London Heathrow, 2017 (Image Credit: British Airways)
Continue reading “British Airways’ Special Boeing 747 Charter Flights”

British Airways’ Most Memorable Boeing 747 Flights

Our series on the story of the Boeing 747 at BA continues with some of the most memorable flights of the past 40 years.

London Air Travel » British Airways

BA Flight 149, BBC News, August 1990
BA Flight 149, BBC News, August 1990

Continuing our series on the story of the Boeing 747 at BA, here are some of the most memorable BA 747 flights from the past 40 years.

These are flights, some of which are still controversial to this today, that are remembered for the wrong reasons. More BA 747 flights from happier times will be shared tomorrow.

BA9 “All Engines Fail” – June 1982

On 24 June 1982, a BA Boeing 747-236 aircraft en route from Kuala Lumpur to Perth plunged 25,000 feet.

All four engines had failed after the aircraft hit a cloud of volcanic ash from Mount Galunggung in West Java, Indonesia.

Captain Eric Moody, who at the time did not know the cause of the engine failure, told passengers: “This is your captain speaking. We have a small problem and all four engines have stopped. We are doing our damndest to get them working again. I trust you are not in too much distress.”

Captain Moody, First Officer Roger Greaves and Engineering Office Barry Townley-Freeman spent 13 minutes trying to regain power on the engines. The aircraft subsequently diverted to Jakarta, where it landed safely.

The Last Flight To Kuwait – August 1990

The circumstances surrounding flight BA149 on 1 August 1990 remain a source of controversy to this day. The flight was scheduled to depart London Heathrow at 16:15 GMT for Kuala Lumpur, via Kuwait and Chennai.

There had been news reports on the day of escalating tensions between Iraq and Kuwait. BA claims it was advised by the British embassy in Kuwait that the situation was calm and there was no reason for the flight, operated by Boeing 747-136 G-AWND, not to operate.

The aircraft was in radio contact with BA in London during the flight. At no point were the flight crew advised of an impending invasion or to divert the aircraft.

The aircraft landed in Kuwait at 04:13 local time.  At around 05:00 local time the airport closed. In the next hour the runway was attacked by Iraqi forces and the aircraft was evacuated.  Passengers and crew immediately went to an airport hotel.

According to BA, 310 passengers and 82 BA employees were held hostage by Iraqis.   Women and children were allowed to return home in late August.  The remaining hostages were dispersed to various sites and some were used as “human shields”.  The last remaining passengers and BA employees were released on 9 December 1990.

The aircraft was destroyed following the liberation of Kuwait.

British Airways Boeing 747-137 Aircraft G-AWND, Kuwait
British Airways Boeing 747-137 Aircraft G-AWND, Kuwait

The controversy surrounding this flight is why it proceeded to operate when other airlines had suspended operations and who in BA and the UK Government knew what, and when.

It has been alleged that the UK Government wanted the aircraft to land in Kuwait to enable an intelligence gathering exercise to take place.

BA has always denied any knowledge of a group of intelligence operatives boarding the aircraft at Heathrow.  The UK Government maintained that the aircraft landed in Kuwait before the invasion and former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher made a statement to that effect before Parliament.

BA has always maintained that it had no knowledge of the impending invasion of Kuwait and that it would never put its aircraft, passengers and crews at risk. No passenger list has ever been released for the flight.

A number of passengers sued BA in different jurisdictions. The airline settled cases brought in the US out of court, citing the cost of litigation. Passengers from France sued the airline and the courts found BA to be negligent and passengers were paid substantial damages. In the UK, attempts to bring the matter to court have been unsuccessful there has been no public inquiry into the circumstances surrounding the flight.

Continue reading “British Airways’ Most Memorable Boeing 747 Flights”

The Queen Of The Skies Ends Its Reign

Our series on the story of the Boeing 747 at BA continues with its abrupt and unplanned retirement in 2020.

London Air Travel » British Airways

British Airways Boeing 747-436 Aircraft
British Airways Boeing 747-436 Aircraft (Image Credit: British Airways)

Had 2020 gone to plan, around 25 BA Boeing 747 aircraft would now be despatching passengers between London Heathrow and numerous destinations around the world.

Those seeking Christmas in New York or winter sun in Cape Town, heading for the alternative reality of Las Vegas, or skiing in Colorado or Whistler via BA would have been carried on a 747.

Some may have complained about ageing interiors or antiquated inflight entertainment systems on certain aircraft. Those sat on the Upper Deck or in the nose of the 747 would have sat comfortably knowing they had at least another three years to enjoy their favourite seats in the house.

Events, as we know, took a very different course in 2020. 31 Boeing 747s met an abrupt and undignified end, save for four that will be preserved at Dunsfold Aerodrome, Kemble Airport and Bro Tathan Business Park, Glamorgan.

It’s not the first time unforeseen events have had an impact on BA’s 747 fleet.

After the events of 11 September 2001, BA’s 747-236 aircraft followed the 747-136 fleet into retirement. 747s at Gatwick were transferred to Heathrow as the airline switched routes to Africa and Central & South America to the airport.

The 57 747-436 aircraft that remained at Heathrow were still the flagship of the long-haul fleet. They were the first to benefit from refreshed First Class, new Club World, and new World Traveller Plus and World Traveller cabins.

BA Club World IFE Screen
BA Club World 2006 (Image Credit: British Airways)
Continue reading “The Queen Of The Skies Ends Its Reign”

BA’s Grand 747 Ambitions For The 1980s and 1990s

Our series on the story of the Boeing 747 at BA continues with its grand ambitions for the 747 in the 1980s and 1990s.

London Air Travel » British Airways

British Airways Boeing 747-400 Aircraft
British Airways Boeing 747-436 Aircraft (Image Credit: British Airways)

Welcome to part three of our seven part series on the story of the Boeing 747 at BA.

In part one we looked at the introduction of the aircraft at BOAC, and in part two the rapid expansion of the 747 network in the 1970s.

The 1980s was a decade of significant change for the airline, under the leadership of Lord King and Colin Marshall. Its corporate identity was revamped ahead of its privatisation in 1987.

In the early 1980s, the airline urgently needed to cut costs. Two Boeing 747-136 aircraft were sold to TWA in 1981. Four new Boeing 747-236 were placed into storage, with two ultimately sold to Malaysian Airlines.

That said, there was continued evolution in the Boeing 747 fleet from the early 1980s.

“The Widest Way To The USA”

One benefit of the Boeing 747 for passengers was that it allowed airlines to introduce new cabins beyond economy and First Class.

After introducing Executive and Club Class for full fare economy passengers, in 1981 BA introduced a dedicated “Super Club” cabin with six abreast seating, dubbed the widest seat in the air.

This would later evolve in to Club World, dubbed the “profit engine” of BA, with the Boeing 747 aircraft being the first to benefit from many innovations and new seats.

British Airways Super Club, November 1981
British Airways Super Club, November 1981

“Get Down Under 3 Hours Quicker”

Modifications to engines also enabled improvements on longer range routes, with BA claiming in 1984 the fastest journey times to Australia, a claim previously made by Qantas.

British Airways Australia Advertisement, December 1984
British Airways Australia Advertisement, December 1984
Continue reading “BA’s Grand 747 Ambitions For The 1980s and 1990s”

“East, West, Our Jumbos Are Best”

Our seven part series on the history of the Boeing 747 at BA continues with the rapid expansion of its 747 network in the 1970s.

London Air Travel » British Airways

British Airways Boeing 747-200 Aircraft Landor Livery
British Airways Boeing 747-236 Aircraft Landor Livery (Image Credit: British Airways)

Welcome to part two of our seven part series looking at the story of the Boeing 747 at BOAC and British Airways following its retirement in 2020.

In part one we looked at the introduction of the aircraft at BOAC, primarily on transatlantic routes. As BA continued to take delivery of more Boeing 747-136 aircraft, and longer range Boeing 747-236 aircraft, it continued to reach more destinations and cut journey times.

“East, West, Our Jumbos Are Best”

In the immediate years following the merger of BEA and BOAC, the 747 was touching all corners of BA’s global network.

New 747 network additions included Boston & Philadelphia, Kingston, Bermuda & Nassau, Tokyo via Anchorage (known as the Polar route) and Auckland.

British Airways Boeing 747 Superflights, March 1975
British Airways Boeing 747 Superflights, March 1975

“Wide Bodies All Over USA!”

By late 1975, BA served New York, Boston & Philadephia, Washington & Detroit and Miami with daily Boeing 747 services. Anchorage was served with a Boeing 747 three times a week.

The one exception in the United States was Los Angeles which was served by a DC10 aircraft. This was leased from Air New Zealand and was operated by BA crews between London Heathrow and Los Angeles, and by Air New Zealand from Los Angeles to Auckland.

British Airways, Boeing 747 USA Services Advertorial, 2 July 1975
British Airways, Boeing 747 USA Services Advertorial, 2 July 1975. Click here for a full PDF version.

In 1976, Barbados gained a non-stop Boeing 747 service with the aircraft continuing to Port of Spain, Trinidad.

At the same time, BA trialled an enhanced economy class service for full fare passengers on flights between London Heathrow and Hong Kong.

48 seats in Zone B of the aircraft were designated as an “Executive Cabin” with a free bar service and inflight entertainment.

British Airways, Boeing 747 Trinidad & Tobago Advertorial, 27 February 1976
British Airways, Boeing 747 Trinidad & Tobago Advertorial, 27 February 1976

“All-747 Service For Australia”

By the summer of 1976, BA had 18 Boeing 747-136 aircraft in its fleet. All services to Australia – Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth and Sydneywere operated with the Boeing 747.

However, multiple stops were still required en route. Only Perth had two stops en-route on some weekly flights. All other cities in Australia served by BA required at least three or four stops.

British Airways, Boeing 747 Australia Advertorial, 13 May 1976
British Airways, Boeing 747 Australia Advertorial, 13 May 1976

“A Touch Of Class For Executives”

After a successful trial on flights between London Heathrow and Hong Kong, the “Executive Cabin” was extended to all Boeing 747 flights in 1977, save for Chicago.

The main benefits were being first to receive the economy inflight service and early disembarkation from the aircraft. Being seated in the Executive cabin was not guaranteed – it could only be requested at the time of booking and passengers were advised to check-in early.

British Airways, Boeing 747 Club Class Advertorial, 27 May 1977
British Airways, Boeing 747 Club Class Advertorial, 27 May 1977
Continue reading ““East, West, Our Jumbos Are Best””

“All The 747 Needed Was BOAC Service”

Welcome to our seven part series on the history of the Boeing 747 at BOAC and British Airways.

London Air Travel » British Airways

BOAC Boeing 747-136 aircraft
BOAC Boeing 747-136 aircraft (Image Credit: British Airways)

“All the 747 needed was BOAC service.”

That was the promise of BOAC as it introduced the Boeing 747 in 1971.

It was a tacit admission the airline had been behind its competitors in introducing the aircraft into service.

It is an understatement to say the launch of the Boeing 747 at BOAC was troubled. It would, of course, become the backbone of its successor airline British Airways until its abrupt and undignified retirement in 2020.

Welcome to part one of a seven part series looking at the Boeing 747 at BOAC and BA.

The Boeing 747 At BOAC

BOAC placed its first order for six Boeing 747-136 aircraft in 1966, following government approval. This would soon to be increased to twelve aircraft.

Although BOAC took delivery of its first Boeing aircraft in May 1970, three aircraft sat idle at London Heathrow for a year due to dispute with its pilots over pay and productivity.

The delay was estimated to have cost BOAC upwards of £25,000 a day. Its transatlantic rivals Pan American World Airways and Trans World Airlines were already operating the Boeing 747 from London and were able to take advantage of rising passenger numbers between Europe and the US.

It did at least allow BOAC to learn of some of the teething troubles of Pan Am and TWA where some passengers complained of chaotic food and beverage service, malfunctioning inflight entertainment, long queues for bathrooms and extended waits for baggage on arrival.

The inaugural BOAC passenger flight from London Heathrow to New York JFK took place on 14 April 1971. Ahead the launch, BOAC opened its own dedicated terminal at New York JFK.

283 passengers were on board the aircraft, which had capacity for 300 passengers in tourist class and 50 passengers in First Class with 6 galleys and 12 bathrooms. At seat inflight entertainment consisted of 4 stereo and 3 mono channels of music. In common with other airlines, the Upper Deck featured a dedicated “Monarch” lounge for First Class passengers.

BOAC Boeing 747 Cabin Interior
BOAC Boeing 747 Cabin Interior (Image Credit: British Airways)
BOAC Boeing 747 Cabin Interior
BOAC Boeing 747 Cabin Interior (Image Credit: British Airways)

The launch of flights to New York JFK was not the end of BOAC’s industrial troubles as a dispute with engineers briefly grounded the aircraft again.

BOAC Boeing 747 Advertisement, April 1971
BOAC Boeing 747 Advertisement, April 1971

BOAC was keen to emphasis distinctive features unique to its Boeing 747 aircraft, such as its humification system. Other features claimed to be unique to BOAC included adjustable headrests and artwork on bulkheads.

BOAC Boeing 747 Advertisement, June 1971
BOAC Boeing 747 Advertisement, June 1971

After New York JFK, daily services to Montreal and Toronto followed on 12 July 1971. Economic pressures did however force BOAC to cancel orders for a further 4 Boeing 747 aircraft beyond its initial order of 12.

BOAC Boeing 747 Toronto & Montreal Advertisement, July 1971
BOAC Boeing 747 Toronto & Montreal Advertisement, July 1971

In November 1971, BOAC launched what it claimed was the first direct Boeing 747 service to Australia via Hong Kong and Darwin.

Continue reading ““All The 747 Needed Was BOAC Service””